Posted by wintvelt on Thu, 12/29/2016 - 19:25

Towers of Hanoi with HTML5Continue reading on Elm shorts »

Posted by Brian Hicks on Thu, 12/29/2016 - 16:00

Adding and changing new fields in your JSON API is just a part of life.
We’ve got to have ways to deal with that!

In Elm, it’s easy to add new fields with optional from Json.Decode.Pipeline.
Let’s do it!

Continue Reading

Posted by Brian Hicks on Thu, 12/29/2016 - 16:00

Adding New Fields to Your JSON Decoder
Adding and changing new fields in your JSON API is just a part of life.
We’ve got to have ways to deal with that!

In Elm, it’s easy to add new fields with optional from Json.Decode.Pipeline.
Let’s do it!

Continue Reading

Posted by Brian Hicks on Mon, 12/26/2016 - 17:00

When you’re writing JSON decoders, it’s helpful to understand what’s going on.
When you’re up in the clouds with your JSON workflow doing all sorts of fancy and advanced stuff, it’s great!

But what about when you don’t need all the fancy stuff?
(Or you’re just getting started?)
Meh.

It’s a hassle to write decoders, objects, and encoders for every single field by hand.
It feels like tedious boilerplate.
Pass.

But really, you don’t have to do it all by hand.
Please meet JSON to Elm.

Continue Reading

Posted by Brian Hicks on Mon, 12/26/2016 - 17:00

Banish Type Tedium with JSON to Elm
When you’re writing JSON decoders, it’s helpful to understand what’s going on.
When you’re up in the clouds with your JSON workflow doing all sorts of fancy and advanced stuff, it’s great!

But what about when you don’t need all the fancy stuff?
(Or you’re just getting started?)
Meh.

It’s a hassle to write decoders, objects, and encoders for every single field by hand.
It feels like tedious boilerplate.
Pass.

But really, you don’t have to do it all by hand.
Please meet JSON to Elm.

Continue Reading

Posted by wintvelt on Wed, 12/21/2016 - 20:26
Posted by dennisreimann on Tue, 12/20/2016 - 02:00

The beauty of The Elm Architecture lies in its simplicity:
It structures applications into four parts and it defines how these interact with each other.
In Elm there is only this one determined way to handle interactions and manage state –
and it provides a good foundation for modularity, code reuse, and testing by default.

Posted by Brian Hicks on Mon, 12/19/2016 - 17:00

 Folds
We’re in the middle of a quest to build a set implementation from scratch.
So far, we’ve implemented our constructors, rotation, balancing, size, and member.
Last week we stopped off to review how folds work.
This week, we’re going to create folds for our set!

Continue Reading

Posted by Brian Hicks on Mon, 12/19/2016 - 17:00

We’re in the middle of a quest to build a set implementation from scratch.
So far, we’ve implemented our constructors, rotation, balancing, size, and member.
Last week we stopped off to review how folds work.
This week, we’re going to create folds for our set!

Continue Reading

Posted by wintvelt on Wed, 12/14/2016 - 15:12

Comparing different approaches to cleaning your Elm codeContinue reading on Elm shorts »

Posted by Brian Hicks on Mon, 12/12/2016 - 17:00

Welcome back!
We’re in the middle of a series about implementing functional data structures in Elm.
In part one we implemented the skeleton of our sets using a binary search tree.
Last week, part two, we added membership tests and size to our set.
This week we’re going to make a quick pit stop to talk about how folds work, and next week we’ll implement them for our set.

Posted by Brian Hicks on Mon, 12/12/2016 - 17:00

The Care and Feeding of Folds in Elm
Welcome back!
We’re in the middle of a series about implementing functional data structures in Elm.
In part one we implemented the skeleton of our sets using a binary search tree.
Last week, part two, we added membership tests and size to our set.
This week we’re going to make a quick pit stop to talk about how folds work, and next week we’ll implement them for our set.

Continue Reading

Posted by wintvelt on Mon, 12/05/2016 - 20:49

The pure version and how it compares to statefulContinue reading on Elm shorts »

Posted by wintvelt on Mon, 12/05/2016 - 20:49

Experimenting with componentsContinue reading on Elm shorts »

Posted by Brian Hicks on Mon, 12/05/2016 - 17:00

Now that our trees balance themselves we can keep replicating the built-in set API.
This week, we’ll answer two questions:

  1. Is an item in the set?
  2. How many items are in the set?

And we’re going to do it recursively!